Drumnadrochit, Inverness

We took a short break to Drumnadrochit, on the north-western shore of Loch Ness.  Although this was supposed to be a family holiday, I did manage to sneak a few photo sessions, mainly of the moths and other insects that visited a light that was conveniently fixed above the door of our accommodation.

Divach Falls, Drumnadrochit,

Divach Falls, near Drumnadrochit

Divach Falls is not as well-known as the nearby Dog Falls, in Glen Affric, but it is more photogenic because nearly the whole length of the falls can be seen from the viewing point. Heavy rain helped to ensure there was plenty of water.

As yet unidentified moth on the door to our room.

Dark Marbled Carpet, Chloroclysta citrata, on a wooden door.

Many small and medium-sized moths, and other night-flying insects, were attracted to the light that we left on each night.  Early starts are necessary to prevent them from either flying away into the forest, or being picked off by birds, once it is light.

Peppered Moth, Biston betularia, light colour form, on Alder.

Peppered Moth, Biston betularia, light colour form, on Alder.

A single Peppered Moth put in an appearance on a nearby Alder tree one morning.  Great camouflage.

Miner bee

Honey bee, Apis mellifera

This very small, very dark and very bedraggled Honey Bee entered our cottage and obliged with a photo opportunity just before I released it.  Thanks for not stinging me!

Sexton Beetle, or Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus investigator

Sexton Beetle, or Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus investigator

Sexton Beetles are so-named because they bury small dead birds or animals before laying their eggs on them.  The larvae feed on the decaying flesh.  Like moths, they are attracted to light.

And a fern abstract to end with: Male Fern, Dryopteris filix-mas, erness, Scotland

Male Fern, Dryopteris filix-mas.

And a fern abstract to end with. No shortage of these in the Highlands.

 

Leave a Reply